Amy Kostak

Review by Joe Freeman, LCSW, MDiv.

Allison Gopnik, PhD, is a rigorous scientist of child learning and development. She is a philosopher who has a knack for explaining complicated concepts in simple ways. Dr. Gopnik is also a grandmother who writes with a strong appreciation for the role of grandparents, particularly grandmothers. She says, “…human beings are, most of all, a cultural species. Our long human childhood allows us to be especially attuned to culture…Grandmothers and grandfathers provide a rich trove of cultural information.”

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Guest blog by Agata and Andy Cavar, Vernon, CT.

One night my husband and I were talking about how our boys (14 & 16) were going to end up living in our basement unless they started learning some life skills.

So we brainstormed a list of basic things we thought adults should know how to do. We decided to call it Spring Training and teach one skill every night after dinner.

The first night, we announced that we would be embarking on Adulting 101. Our plan was received with eye rolls, groans and exasperated sighs. The first lesson was how to fix a tripped breaker. Once we started talking about it, to our surprise, the boys were genuinely interested! They asked questions, talked about circuits watts, amps, and electricity. One question lead to another and we were having a real conversation! And it wasn’t about homework, school drama, or who needed to clean their room. How refreshing! Continue reading

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By Brittnie Stoy.

Is your child suddenly sullen, withdrawn, or seeming to avoid contact with you?

Have you observed marked changes in his behaviors and personality?

Is she afraid to ride the school bus or reluctant to go to school?

These are just a few of the possible warning signs that your child is being bullied. (Bullying is defined as any unwanted, aggressive behavior that is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time.)

Repeated bullying may cause significant emotional harm and can erode a child’s self-worth and mental health. Whether bullying is verbal, physical or relational, the long-term effects can be equally harmful. Continue reading

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During a recent online class, a parent asked the questions, “What do you do when your eight-year-old child calls themselves stupid or dumb all the time? I respond with ‘No you’re not‘ but they just say back, ‘Yes I am!‘”

This is a great question and we hear it from lots of parents. Continue reading

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By Ruth E. Freeman, LCSW.

How often do you worry about your kids’ struggles and give lots of advice about how to handle their problems?
Have you found yourself wishing your child was more independent and capable of solving problems?
Do you know which problems belong to you to solve and which ones belong to your children?

Parents often have strong emotions about problems that belong to their children. Maybe your daughter is being ignored by her former best friend. Maybe your son is having difficulty with his math teacher. Maybe your teen hates doing homework. The fact that these struggles cause you to feel emotions should not be misunderstood as a reason to solve your child’s problems. Continue reading

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By Ashley Maturo.

As you begin to read this post, think about the device you are using.

Are you accessing our website from a computer? A tablet? A smartphone?

It’s no secret that technology has become an important part of society and provides us with many benefits. It has made keeping in contact with others, staying organized and accessing information (such as this blog) faster, easier and more convenient than ever before.

That said, there also may be some downsides to our daily access to technology. One of the most recently observed is Technoference. Continue reading

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Potty Training Webinar

By Brittnie Stoy.

“I don’t know what to think.  The first week he used the potty and now he refuses to use it and wants diapers!”

“She uses the potty at daycare, but at home, she sometimes pees on the floor and then tells me she did.  What’s up with that?”

“I don’t even know how to start potty training!”

If you can relate to any of these, you are in the right place. Let’s face it. Potty training is not always an easy task. The reality is that some children have strong, adverse reactions to this transition. Continue reading

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By Ashley Maturo & Amy Kostak.

All children are born with personality traits that remain relatively constant throughout their lives. Some kids are more sensitive or more withdrawn. Others are born more active or more persistent.

But two traits that can change, with a little help from parents, are optimism and resilience. Optimism is a positive outlook and hopefulness; resilience is the capacity to effectively bounce back from challenges. These traits are key components of happiness. The good news is that happiness is a skill that you can teach your children. Continue reading

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