Live Webinars

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By Ruth E. Freeman, LCSW.

How often do you worry about your kids’ struggles and give lots of advice about how to handle their problems?
Have you found yourself wishing your child was more independent and capable of solving problems?
Do you know which problems belong to you to solve and which ones belong to your children?

Parents often have strong emotions about problems that belong to their children. Maybe your daughter is being ignored by her former best friend. Maybe your son is having difficulty with his math teacher. Maybe your teen hates doing homework. The fact that these struggles cause you to feel emotions should not be misunderstood as a reason to solve your child’s problems. Continue reading

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registerThu, Mar 22, 2018 at 12 PM (noon)

Your older child was so excited about the new baby. But, now that your baby is 18 mos, he is uncooperative and sometimes acts like a baby, himself. Meanwhile, you’re trying to control your youngest as she starts to throw tantrums and learns the word “no.”

This scenario is all too common, but there are simple tools you can use to increase your children’s compliance and decrease your stress.

During this live, online class, we will help you to:

  • understand why your kids are acting up
  • create routines that prevent challenging behaviors from emerging
  • promote cooperative relationships between your baby and everyone else in the family
  • implement easy, everyday practices that make for a peaceful home

This live, online class is designed for parents of infants and toddlers with older siblings.

Presenter: JoAnn Robinson, PhD

Peace at Home Parenting guidance does not stop when this class is over. After class, you will be invited to join our private Facebook group. There, you will have unlimited access to our team of parenting experts, who will share tips and answer parents’ questions. This Facebook community is also a place to connect with other caring parents, like you. We welcome parents to share challenges and celebrate successes.

In addition, you will receive access to free monthly “Question and Answer” sessions. During these sessions, you will be coached in applying the skills you learned in Peace at Home classes and again you will connect with other parents working to improve skills.

Price: $10.00 USD

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By Ashley Maturo & Amy Kostak.

All children are born with personality traits that remain relatively constant throughout their lives. Some kids are more sensitive or more withdrawn. Others are born more active or more persistent.

But two traits that can change, with a little help from parents, are optimism and resilience. Optimism is a positive outlook and hopefulness; resilience is the capacity to effectively bounce back from challenges. These traits are key components of happiness. The good news is that happiness is a skill that you can teach your children. Continue reading

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registerFor parents of children with ADHD or Autism

Tue, Feb 27, 2018 . 8:15 PM – 9:00 PM EST

Self-awareness and self-acceptance are the foundations of your child’s social life, but parents often struggle to strengthen these capacities in children.

During this live, online class you will gain practical skills that will help your child to:

  • Build strong, healthy, lasting relationships
  • Become more aware of himself and his surroundings
  • Accept herself and accept those around her exactly as they are

Presenter: Aaron Weintraub, MS

Peace at Home Parenting guidance does not stop when this class is over. After class, you will be invited to join our private Facebook group. There, you will have unlimited access to our team of parenting experts, who will share tips and answer parents’ questions. This Facebook community is also a place to connect with other caring parents, like you. We welcome parents to share challenges and celebrate successes. 

In addition, you will receive access to free monthly “Question and Answer” sessions. During these sessions, you will be coached in applying the skills you learned in Peace at Home classes and again you will connect with other parents working to improve skills.

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By Amy Kostak, CFLE.

Virtually all books about potty training emphasize that toddlers have observable signals of readiness. One facet of readiness – which is usually overlooked – is the development of a cooperative parent-child relationship.
Potty training may seem like it’s just about your child, but it’s equally about you.

Before you begin the toilet training process, ask yourself three questions: Continue reading

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By Brynn Rosadino.

Are you ever overwhelmed by your child’s challenging behaviors?
Do you struggle to stay calm as your child escalates?

If you said yes to either of those questions, you are not alone.

Human beings are built to reflect each other’s emotions. When our children display intense feelings and behaviors, our brains naturally mirror those emotions. We start to feel stressed, angry, fearful, or overwhelmed just like our children.

When a child escalates, it is important to remain a calm center for that child. Though it may not always come naturally, we can learn strategies and coping mechanisms to help during these stressful times.  Continue reading

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By Amy Kostak, CFLE-P.

The teenage years are crucial to a person’s healthy development, but they can be daunting to parents. While teens are seeking more independence, parents are grasping for connection. This disconnect can result in a lot of frustration. Luckily, we have some strategies that parents can use to improve their relationships with their teens. Continue reading

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5 Positive Ways to Discipline Your Kids

By Ashley Maturo.

As a parent, you know how frustrating it feels when you can’t get your kids to stop misbehaving. No matter how many times you have tried to get them to settle down, they just don’t seem to want to listen. Punishment may seem like the easier solution but there are other, more positive ways a parent can get their child to cooperate that don’t involve the timeout chair. And you may have already noticed – punishment doesn’t improve behavior in the long run. Continue reading

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